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Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease is a narrowing of the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the heart. It's the number one cause of death for Americans, but is mostly preventable, so understanding this threat can truly save lives. We examine the latest in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease. Find out if you could be at risk and what you can do to keep your heart healthy.

Guests

Michael J. Martinelli, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.
Chief of Cardiology at St. Peter's Hospital, where he is a member of the Physician Advisory Committee, and a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions.

David G. Wolinsky, M.D.
Director of Nuclear Cardiology and the Clinical Research Department at Albany Associates in Cardiology and Director of Cardiac Rehabilitation at St. Peter's Hospital, as well as a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Albany Medical College.

Amy Milstein, M.S., R.D., C.D.E.
Dietitian and diabetes educator at the Albany location of the Center for Preventive Medicine and Cardiovascular Health.

Related Resources

• The American Heart Association seeks to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

• The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers educational materials about coronary artery disease and heart attacks, including what you can do to greatly reduce your risk through lifestyle changes and, in some cases, medication.

GoRedForWomen.org works to change the perception that heart disease is a 'man's disease' and to reduce coronary heart disease and stroke.

HeartHub is the American Heart Association's patient portal for information, tools and resources about cardiovascular disease and stroke.

MedlinePlus presents information on coronary artery disease from the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health.

• The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute features a detailed description of coronary artery disease, along with graphic representations of what a narrowed artery looks like.

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