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Forces of Nature

Last Updated by WMHT Web Editor on

Watch Wednesdays, September 14 - October 5, 2016, at 8pm on WMHT-TV

The forces that have kept the Earth on the move since it was formed billions of years ago are explored in FORCES OF NATURE, a BBC co-production that premieres Wednesday, September 14, 2016, at 8pm on WMHT-TV.

In each of the four episodes, the series illustrates how we experience Earth’s natural forces, including shape, elements, color and motion. Although we can’t immediately feel the motion of Earth’s fundamental forces, we witness the consequences, such as tidal bores surging through the Amazon rainforest or the intense and ruinous power of hurricanes.

                      

Episodes

Shape | Wednesday, September 14 at 8pm

We can’t directly see the forces that govern Earth, but we can see their shadows in the shapes of nature that surround us. If we understand why these shapes exist, we can understand the rules that bind the entire universe.

 

Elements | Wednesday, September 21 at 8pm (Encore Sunday, September 25 at 10am)

The forces of nature make Earth a restless planet, but they also turned our ball of rock into a home for life. How did our planet’s ingredients, the chemical elements, come together and take that first crucial step from barren rock to a living world?

 

Color | Wednesday, September 28 at 8pm (Encore Sunday, October 2 at 10am)

Earth is painted in stunning colors. By understanding how these colors are created and the energy they carry, we can learn the secret language of the planet.

 

Motion | Wednesday, October 5 at 8pm (Encore Sunday, October 9 at 10am)

The forces of nature have kept Earth on the move since it was formed billions of years ago. Though we can’t feel the motion, we experience the consequences – from tidal bores surging through the Amazon rainforest to the ruinous power of hurricanes.

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